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Computing gpu ban could hurt China, but give local companies a chance

Computing gpu ban could hurt China, but give local companies a chance

Shortly after it became known that the US had imposed restrictions on the supply of advanced AMD and NVIDIA computing gas pedals to China and Russia, NVIDIA reported that the US government has allowed it to continue developing H100 gas pedals in China and continue supplying A100 gas pedals to its US customers with data centers in China until 1 March 2023.
Still, the new restrictions have raised questions about the long-term prospects of the graphics chip industry in China.Image source: DigiTimesTalking about the prospects of the graphics processor market in China, Jing Zhu, vice president of the China Semiconductor Industry Association (CSIA), noted in an interview with Ijiwei that the latest restrictions imposed on graphics chip imports are an extension of earlier US attempts to hit the Chinese high performance computing industry.After the 2015 launch of Tianhe 1 and Tianhe supercomputer The sanctions also affected Intel, which was subsequently banned from supplying Xeon processors for the Tianhe 2 upgrade.
In subsequent years, the U.S.
continued to pursue sanctions policies against Chinese supercomputer companies, including other branches of the National Supercomputer Center.Zhu noted that sanctioned companies had to obtain chips capable of performing double-precision (FP64) calculations through other channels, such as front firms.
Zhu suggested that NVIDIA and AMD could have offered dedicated GPUs without FP64 support in the Chinese market to circumvent the ban, but they still would have faced additional costs.
Taiwanese and Chinese suppliers of data center peripherals, including motherboard controllers and power management chips, will also reportedly be affected by the new restrictions.China is making efforts to bridge the gap with leading firms in the GPU market.
Several new companies have emerged here in recent years, trying to compete with the leaders like AMD and NVIDIA.
Among them are Moore Threads and Biren Technology, created by former NVIDIA employees.Founded in 2016, Jingjia Microelectronics (Jingjia Micro) has developed its own MUSA architecture, which it uses in its MTT S60 desktop graphics cards and MTT S2000 server-focused gas pedals.
In 2021, Jingjia Micro was placed on the U.S.
Department of Commerce's Entity List, and in 2022 it released two versions of the JM9 GPUs, whose performance received mixed reviews from experts.In turn, Biren Technology has created the BR100 AI gas pedal, which is said to outperform NVIDIA A100 in several areas, from computer vision to natural language processing.

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